A DAMNABLE and SINISTER REGIME: Vale Royal Abbey 1260~1538

A DAMNABLE and SINISTER REGIME: Vale Royal Abbey 1260~1538
New local history book by local historian tells the story of the medieval abbey of Vale Royal
 
 
A DAMNABLE and SINISTER REGIME:
Vale Royal Abbey 1260~1538
 
 
by Tony Bostock, an accomplished local historian and the author of a number of books and many articles on various aspects of Cheshire history, contributing regularly to the annual journal, Cheshire History. Much of his work is published on his web-site: www.tonybostock.com. He is a regular speaker to local history and family history societies and other organisations throughout the county.
 
 
Thiis new illustrated paperback book is available now from AMAZON BOOKS UK (www.amazon.co.uk/books) priced £14.99/Kindle £5.99 or contact the author direct:
 
 
 
VALE ROYAL ABBEY is a former medieval abbey and later country house at Whitegate. The original building was founded c.1265 by the Lord Edward, later King Edward I, for Cistercian monks. Edward intended the structure to be on a grand scale. Had it been completed it would have been the largest Cistercian monastery in Europe - but his ambitions were frustrated by recurring financial difficulties and the Welsh wars added to which what was eventually what was built fell down in a storm!
 
When work resumed in the late fourteenth century, the building was considerably smaller than originally planned. Throughout its history the abbey was mismanaged and poor relations with the local population sparked riots. These included the murder of an abbot, rape and robbery. There was internal disorder too. The abbey was described in the early sixteenth century as a ‘damnable and sinister regime', hence the title of the book. Vale Royal was closed in 1538 by Henry VIII during his Dissolution of the Monasteries. Overall a 'failed enterprise' - a failure in the monastic ideal and in never becoming the grandiose building intended.
 
This story of Vale Royal is written in a way as to appeal to the general reader, those who have an interest in medieval monasticism, and of course those who enjoy learning about Cheshire’s past. In addition to relating the history of the abbey there is a final chapter on the man responsible for the abbey’s destruction, Sir Thomas Holcroft, who established a home among the mediaeval cloistral buildings. Sir Thomas is an intriguing character who served three monarchs as a courtier, soldier, diplomat and spy master
Margaret Roberts

Written by : Margaret Roberts